Posts tagged ‘146th’

May 7, 2012

Map of 146th Regiment’s Movement

As previously discussed, Jacob J. Wakefield served with the 146th Indiana Regiment during the Civil War. Although they were mustered into service late in the war, I thought it would interested to track their journey from Indianapolis to Baltimore. Below is a high-level map of their path to Baltimore:

The regiment began in Indianapolis and primarily worked guard and post duties for a short stretch of locations from Winchester, VA to Harper’s Ferry, WV, represented by the green location markers. Later the regiment was divided to work various locations in Maryland and Delaware, represented by the yellow location markers. The red marker’s indicate their final stops at the Indiana State House and Camp Carrington.

Information on the 146th as found on another researcher’s site:

According to ONE YEAR REGIMENTS OF 1865, the 146th left Indianapolis in March 11, 1865, under the command of Colonel Merit C. Welsh. It arrived in Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, on March 15. The regiment was then assigned to one of the provisional divisions of the Army of the Shenandoah. Until July 27, 1865, it was assigned post and guard duty at Charlestown, Winchester, Stevenson Station, Jordan’s Springs, and Summit Point, Virginia.

The regiment was then assigned to the Military District of Delaware with General Lockwood commanding. Companies were sent to Hick’s General Hospital, Baltimore; Havre De Grace, Dover, Wilmington and Salisbury in Delaware; and Easton, Maryland. On August 31, 1865, the regiment rejoined in Baltimore and was mustered out. The regiment was back in Indianapolis on September 8, 1865, and was welcomed with a reception held on the State House lawn. After marching to Camp Carrington, it was paid off and discharged.

From the Indiana Historical Society, information regarding Camp Carrington:

Camp Carrington was established as a Civil War camp in 1862 in Indianapolis. It was named for General Henry B. Carrington, who served as Colonel and Brigadier General in the Union Army. It was one of the largest of the twenty-four camps established during the war in the Indianapolis area, and was located between the Canal and Fall Creek near present-day 15th and Missouri Streets. When it originally opened it was known as Camp Murray. It replaced Camp Morton as the main training camp when Camp Morton was established as a POW camp. During the last year of the war practically all the Indiana regiments were organized there.

April 23, 2012

Jacob J. Wakefield, Civil War Soldier

Jacob J. Wakefield, son of James Wakefield and Elizabeth Ann Jones, was 31 years old when the Civil War began. In 1863 he registered for the draft, with his brother Thomas T. Wakefield, and approximately 18 months later he was mustering with the 146th Indiana Infantry Regiment.

Note: His age is incorrectly stated on the draft registration.

He was mustered into service twice. First with the 145th Indiana Infantry Regiment then with the 146th Indiana Infantry Regiment. The 145th mustered out of Indianapolis just a few weeks before the 146th. It is possible that Jacob saw action with the 145th and later joined up with the 146th. I think that he was initially assigned to the 145th but for some reason was diverted to the 146th. Further research is necessarity to clear up this issue.  

A brief history of the 146th Indiana Infantry Unit from the Civil War Index

This regiment was recruited in the 1st, 3d and 4th Congressional districts and organized at Indianapolis in Feb., 1865. It was mustered in March 9 and left the state on the 11th for Harper’s Ferry, Va., where it was assigned to one of the provisional divisions of the Army of the Shenandoah. It was engaged in post and guard duty at Charlestown, Winchester, Stephenson’s depot, Jordan’s Springs and Summit Point, until July 27, when it was ordered to the Relay House, then to Baltimore, and assigned to duty in the Military District of Delaware. One company was detached for duty at Hicks’ General Hospital, Baltimore, one at Havre de Grace, one at Dover, one at Wilmington, Del., one at Salisbury, and one at Easton, Md. It was mustered out Aug. 31, 1865. Its strength was 979. Loss by death, 29; desertion, 30; unaccounted for, 7.

When the regiment mustered out, in Baltimore, Jacob had been promoted to Corporal. Sadly, Jacob did not live long after the Civil War. Jacob passed away in 1869 leaving behind his wife, Susannah Jane (Banta) Wakefield, and their 6 kids.