Archive for ‘Indiana’

May 25, 2012

Jesse F. Bruther Death Certificate

This is the death certificate of Jesse F. Bruther. Jesse was the son of Caleb Bruther and Emily Burgtal and the father of Loretta Elizabeth (Bruther) Wakefield.

Jesse was December 19, 1867 and died April 10, 1950. He is buried in Old Bethel Cemetery.

May 25, 2012

Lewis and Grace (Miskell) Bruther

This is a photo of Lewis N. Bruther and his new wife, Grace A. Miskell. They were married on July 28, 1889 in Jefferson County, Indiana. Lewis is the brother of my great-grandfather, Jesse F. Bruther. Jesse is the father of Loretta Elizabeth (Bruther) Wakefield.

Sadly, Lewis died just 2 1/2 years after he and Grace were married.

May 25, 2012

Will Smythe

While visiting with Ruth Ann (Bruther) Hoover in California this past February, she was kind enough to lend me this photo of her uncle, William (Will) Smythe. Will is the husband of Elsie Emily (Bruther) Smythe. Ruth Ann is the daughter of Ervin D. Bruther and Clara (Hargitt) Bruther.

May 22, 2012

Willard Totten Wakefield

My mom has had this photo in her living room for several years and I have wanted to make a copy of it for just as long. Finally, after years of pleading, she gave up the picture so I could make a copy. The picture is of Willard Totten Wakefield, a.k.a. Bobo, likely taken when he was a teenager. The quality is not that great but it probably is one of the earliest pictures of Bobo that we have in our collection.

May 15, 2012

John Wakefield in the War of 1812 (Indiana)

Soldiers from Indiana played a critical role in the War of 1812. Among the participants in the war was John Wakefield, a private from Franklin County serving under Captains Shultz and Clements.

From the Indiana Muster, Pay and Receipt Rolls, Indiana Territory Volunteers and Militia, War of 1812, we can see several payments made to John for his services to his country. John’s entries can be found in Volume 3 on pages 474, 475, 476, 477, and 478. The following image is an inverted copy of page 478 showing John Wakefield’s signature for receipt of payment for his services:

 

From IUPUI’s University Library, information about this War of 1812 collection:

This collection consists of Muster, pay and receipt rolls of Indiana territory volunteers or militia of the period of the War of 1812. They are in the form of four oversized bound volumes of photostats made by Leet Brothers Co. in 1926 from information in the U.S. Adjutant General’s Office. According to the following note, “The U.S. Adjutant general states that these records do not include the names of soldiers of the regular army of the U.S. and member of the U.S. Rangers who enlisted from Indiana territory. The names listed…include Justices of the Peace, administrators, administratrices, clerk of court, witnesses, widows, attorneys, substitutes, etc.”

The four physical volumes digitized here reside in the collection of the Genealogy Division, Indiana State Library. An Index was created by Genealogy Division staff and bound into Volume 1.

May 7, 2012

Map of 146th Regiment’s Movement

As previously discussed, Jacob J. Wakefield served with the 146th Indiana Regiment during the Civil War. Although they were mustered into service late in the war, I thought it would interested to track their journey from Indianapolis to Baltimore. Below is a high-level map of their path to Baltimore:

The regiment began in Indianapolis and primarily worked guard and post duties for a short stretch of locations from Winchester, VA to Harper’s Ferry, WV, represented by the green location markers. Later the regiment was divided to work various locations in Maryland and Delaware, represented by the yellow location markers. The red marker’s indicate their final stops at the Indiana State House and Camp Carrington.

Information on the 146th as found on another researcher’s site:

According to ONE YEAR REGIMENTS OF 1865, the 146th left Indianapolis in March 11, 1865, under the command of Colonel Merit C. Welsh. It arrived in Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, on March 15. The regiment was then assigned to one of the provisional divisions of the Army of the Shenandoah. Until July 27, 1865, it was assigned post and guard duty at Charlestown, Winchester, Stevenson Station, Jordan’s Springs, and Summit Point, Virginia.

The regiment was then assigned to the Military District of Delaware with General Lockwood commanding. Companies were sent to Hick’s General Hospital, Baltimore; Havre De Grace, Dover, Wilmington and Salisbury in Delaware; and Easton, Maryland. On August 31, 1865, the regiment rejoined in Baltimore and was mustered out. The regiment was back in Indianapolis on September 8, 1865, and was welcomed with a reception held on the State House lawn. After marching to Camp Carrington, it was paid off and discharged.

From the Indiana Historical Society, information regarding Camp Carrington:

Camp Carrington was established as a Civil War camp in 1862 in Indianapolis. It was named for General Henry B. Carrington, who served as Colonel and Brigadier General in the Union Army. It was one of the largest of the twenty-four camps established during the war in the Indianapolis area, and was located between the Canal and Fall Creek near present-day 15th and Missouri Streets. When it originally opened it was known as Camp Murray. It replaced Camp Morton as the main training camp when Camp Morton was established as a POW camp. During the last year of the war practically all the Indiana regiments were organized there.

April 24, 2012

My Mom in Franklin, 1950s

As mentioned in my previous post, my grandparents lived for a few years in Franklin, Indiana. Here is a picture of my Mom, Sally Jo (Wakefield) Meziere, as a young child in Franklin.

Note: My Mom is the one standing.

April 24, 2012

Grandparents in Franklin, 1950s

My grandparents, Willard Darrell Wakefield and Phyllis Ruth (Stage) Wakefield, were married in July, 1953. After they were married they lived in Franklin, Indiana until they eventually moved to New Whiteland, Indiana, the place they have called home for over 50 years. The following is their listing from 1957 Franklin directory:

The listing shows my grandparents living at 1681 Francis Street in Franklin. It also lists my grandpa’s occupation as factory worker. Here is the location of the house:

April 23, 2012

Isaac Wakefield in 1940 Census

Here is my great-great-grandfather’s entry from the 1940 census. He is living with his oldest son, Wallie, otherwise known as Walter Craig Wakefield, and his recently deceased wife’s sister, Nina Boggs. They are living in a rented house outside the town limits of Hanover, Indiana in Hanover Township, Jefferson County.

Note: The entry after Isaac’s is Gordon Bruther and his family. Gordon is Loretta Elizabeth (Bruther) Wakefield’s first cousin.

April 23, 2012

Jacob J. Wakefield’s Family in the 1860 and 1870 Censuses

Jacob J. Wakefield’s family in the 1860 census and the 1870 census. The 1870 census shows the widowed Susannah living with her parents, Jacob and Sarah Banta.

April 23, 2012

Jacob J. Wakefield, Civil War Soldier

Jacob J. Wakefield, son of James Wakefield and Elizabeth Ann Jones, was 31 years old when the Civil War began. In 1863 he registered for the draft, with his brother Thomas T. Wakefield, and approximately 18 months later he was mustering with the 146th Indiana Infantry Regiment.

Note: His age is incorrectly stated on the draft registration.

He was mustered into service twice. First with the 145th Indiana Infantry Regiment then with the 146th Indiana Infantry Regiment. The 145th mustered out of Indianapolis just a few weeks before the 146th. It is possible that Jacob saw action with the 145th and later joined up with the 146th. I think that he was initially assigned to the 145th but for some reason was diverted to the 146th. Further research is necessarity to clear up this issue.  

A brief history of the 146th Indiana Infantry Unit from the Civil War Index

This regiment was recruited in the 1st, 3d and 4th Congressional districts and organized at Indianapolis in Feb., 1865. It was mustered in March 9 and left the state on the 11th for Harper’s Ferry, Va., where it was assigned to one of the provisional divisions of the Army of the Shenandoah. It was engaged in post and guard duty at Charlestown, Winchester, Stephenson’s depot, Jordan’s Springs and Summit Point, until July 27, when it was ordered to the Relay House, then to Baltimore, and assigned to duty in the Military District of Delaware. One company was detached for duty at Hicks’ General Hospital, Baltimore, one at Havre de Grace, one at Dover, one at Wilmington, Del., one at Salisbury, and one at Easton, Md. It was mustered out Aug. 31, 1865. Its strength was 979. Loss by death, 29; desertion, 30; unaccounted for, 7.

When the regiment mustered out, in Baltimore, Jacob had been promoted to Corporal. Sadly, Jacob did not live long after the Civil War. Jacob passed away in 1869 leaving behind his wife, Susannah Jane (Banta) Wakefield, and their 6 kids.

April 14, 2012

Bobo and Lora, 1948

In February, my grandparents, my mother, and I took a trip out to California to visit Ferris, Pat, and their family. While there, I had the opportunity to make copies of some photos that Ferris and Pat had. Included in those photos was a picture of Willard Totten (Bobo) Wakefield and Loretta Elizabeth (Lora) Bruther from 1948.

April 12, 2012

James Wakefield, More Than Just a Farmer

This article is in reference to James Wakefield, born in South Carolina in 1803, husband of Elizabeth Ann Jones, and resident of Craig Township, Switzerland County, Indiana from the late 1840s until his death in 1876.

 

According to the 1860 census, in which James was 57 years old, James’s occupation was that of a farmer. Unbeknownst to me until just a few days ago, James also was a peddler and even dabbled as a retailer selling liquor. According to Indiana tax records from the 1860s, James was assessed a tax annually from 1862 to 1866 for a Class B License and in 1866 was assessed an additional tax as a retail liquor dealer.

  • 1862 – November, 18 – Class B License – 3rd Class Peddler – Amount of Tax: $10.00 
  • 1863 – May, 15 – Class B License – Peddler – Amount of Tax: $6.67
  • 1864 – July – Class B License – 3rd Class Peddler – Amount of Tax: $12.50
  • 1865 – Annual Assessment – 2nd Class Peddler – Amount of Tax: $25
  • 1866 – 6/1 – Annual Assessment – 2nd Class Peddler – Amount of Tax: $25
  • 1866 – 6/1 – Annual Assessment – Retail Liquor Dealer – Amount of Tax: $25 

It is unknown, at this time, if James did his business beyond his farm. It is known, however, that he was a resident of Craig Township for the period he was being assessed the tax. It is also unknown what type of liquor he sold and the source of that liquor.

Since these assessments were primarily during the Civil War, it is possible that these ventures were a result of a void in the market caused by the departure of younger men engaged in the war effort. It could also have been undertaken as a result of financial necessity since Jacob and Thomas, sons of James, were involved in the war effort. With James and Thomas away, it is possible that James assisted his extended family with the additional income earned from these ventures. Another possibility is that James, being older, was not able to work the land like he once did or was missing the help provided by his sons, and others at war. Without the ability to produce a viable income from farming, a second, or alternative job, may have been a necessity.

Next steps are to review of the tax assessment periods to see if James was assessed a tax beyond this range and to browse through Vevay newspaper from the 1860s to see if there are any references to James or liquor establishments. Maybe we’ll get lucky find an additional piece of information.

September 15, 2009

Wakefield and Davis families in Brookville, IN in late 1810s

I knew that the Davis and Wakefield families were close but it never really occurred to me how close they could or would be. In the miscellaneous records for Franklin County, Indiana found at the LDS Genealogy Library the following was found:

 

The Wakefields were living with the Davis family on Market Street in Brookville. The families did not stay here long as they moved to Bartholomew County, Indiana and then to Tennessee. Not surprisingly, the Wakefields and Davis family are found living next door to each other in the 1830 census in Tennessee.

September 15, 2009

Old Bethal Cemetery Near Hanover, IN

This cemetery is the resting place for several family members. Buried here include:

Bruther, Bertha
Bruther, Caleb
Bruther, Charles
Bruther, Charles E.
Bruther, Dave
Bruther, Elizabeth
Bruther, Ella
Bruther, Emily (Burgtal – Caleb’s wife)
Bruther, Eva
Bruther, Jesse F.
Bruther, M. Frances
Bruther, Omer
Bruther, W. W.
Turner, Mattie M. (Omer’s Wife)
Wakefield, Loretta
Wakefield, Willard Totten

For a complete list of individuals buried at Old Bethal Cemetery:
Old Bethal Cemetery Records

 

 

 

September 13, 2009

Obituary of Elizabeth Ann (Boggs) Wakefield

This is Elizabeth Ann (Boggs) Wakefield’s obituary. Annie was born February 5, 1866 in Warsaw, Kentucky. She died on November 26, 1936.

 

September 13, 2009

Wakefield Boggs Wedding Announcement

This is the wedding announcement of Isaac Faries Wakefield and Elizabeth Ann ‘Annie’ Boggs. They were married on October 27, 1892 in Switzerland County, Indiana. This was Isaac’s second marriage.

 

September 13, 2009

Birth Certificate of Willard Totten Wakefield

The following birth certificate, record #757, was located in the Madison, Indiana’s Record Of Births, Jan 1897 to June 1905.

Date Of Birth: March 16, 1903 (Released March 31, 1903)
Place Of Birth: Madison, Indiana

Father: I. Wakefield, age 42, Farmer
Place of Birth is Craig, Indiana

Mother: Anna Boggs, age 38
Place of Birth is Warsaw, Kentucky
Residence is City (Madison)
# of children of this mother: 6

Post Office is Madison

September 13, 2009

Obituary of Elizabeth Ann (Jones) Wakefield

This article is from the Thursday, December 5, 1895 edition of the Vevay Reveille.

Elizabeth Ann (Jones) Wakefield was born on March 6, 1811 in Ohio, died, according to this article, on November 23, 1895, and was the wife of James Wakefield. Eliza passed away at the home of her daughter, Evaline A. Wakefield and, son-in-law, Isaac F. Banta.

 

September 13, 2009

Bruther Reunion (1983) in Madison, Indiana

From 8-25-1983 Madison, Indiana newspaper.

Bruther Reunion held at family farm

The Bruther family reunion was held last Sunday, Aug 21, at the shelter house on the Bill and Lee Bruther farm, with a lavish pitch-in dinner enjoyed.

Gifts were later presented to the person traveling the greatest distance, Mrs. Thomas Bruther, Fort Myers, Fla., whose husband died this past April 22, the oldest one present, William J. Means, 86, Seymour, and the youngest, Chad Watson, three months, two days.

Those attending from Hanover area were Gordon Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Smythe, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Bruther and Gene, Mr. and Mrs. William Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Danny Bruther, Jimmy, Jeremy and Jerrod, Mr. and Mrs. David Bruther, Tonia and Mike, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Webster, Lori and Andy, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bruther, Kristie and Kendra, Mrs. Delinda Barber, Keveie and Carrie, Tony Monroe and Stephanie James, Mrs. Nancy Bruther, Rev. and Mrs. Ron Bruther, Dana and Stephanie, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Jackson and Rachel, J. C. Clem, William Douglas Bruther and Julie Brown, Jimmy Bruther and Sheryl Vaught, Josh and Aaron, Todd Bruther, Gary Hamilton and Vicky Shirmer.

Madison area residents present were Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Alva Vestal, John Vestal and Robert Vestal, Mr. and Mrs. Steve Liter and Brian, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Watson, Angie and Chad, Mr. and Mrs. John Steinhardt and Christy, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cline, Joshua, Marie and Joseph.

Present from other locations in Indiana in addition to Mr. Means were: Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Murphy, David Terry and David and Mary Chasteen, Seymour; Mrs. Dorothy Griffith, Ernest Bruther, Deputy; Mr. and Mrs. Cecil J. Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Pollard, and Miss Peggy Bruther, Indianapolis; Mr. and Mrs. Millis Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Steve Kloepfer, Amber and Kirstie, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wooten, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wilson, Heather, Bob, Jessica, and Amanda, Mr. and Mrs. Louie Bruther, Mrs. Phyllis Ponder, Lori and Tray, Jay Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gassert, Amy and Lance, Tracey Wyne and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clark, all of the Lexington area.

Attending from other states in addition to Mrs. Thomas (Isabelle) Bruther, were Mr. and Mrs. Woodie Bruther and Tina, Bedford, Ky.

Index:
Barber, Carrie
Barber, Keveie
Barber, Mrs. Delinda
Brown, Julie
Bruther, Dana
Bruther, Ernest
Bruther, Gordon
Bruther, Gene
Bruther, Jimmy
Bruther, Jimmy
Bruther, Jeremy
Bruther, Jerrod
Bruther, Kendra
Bruther, Kristie
Bruther, Mike
Bruther, Miss Peggy
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil J.
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Danny
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. David
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Donnie
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Louie
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. William
Bruther, Mr. and Mrs. Woodie
Bruther, Mrs. Nancy
Bruther, Mrs. Thomas (Isabella)
Bruther, Rev. and Mrs. Ron
Bruther, Stephanie
Bruther, Tina
Bruther, Todd
Bruther, Tonia
Bruther, William Douglas
Chasteen, Mary
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Clem, J.C.
Cline, Joseph
Cline, Joshua
Cline, Marie
Cline, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Gassert, Amy
Gassert, Lance
Gassert, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Griffith, Mrs. Dorothy
Hamilton, Gary
Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry
Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Millis
Jackson, Rachel
James, Stephanie
Kloepfer, Amber
Kloepfer, Kirstie
Kloepfer, Mrs. Steve
Liter, Brian
Liter, Mr. and Mrs. Steve
Lynch, Jay
Means, William J.
Monroe, Tony
Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon
Pollard, Mrs. Ted
Ponder, Lori
Ponder, Mrs. Phyllis
Ponder, Tray
Shirmer, Vicky
Smythe, Mr. and Mrs. Leroy
Steinhardt, Christy
Steinhardt, Mr. and Mrs. John
Terry, David
Vaught, Aaron
Vaught, Josh
Vaught, Sheryl
Vestal, John
Vestal, Mrs. Alva
Vestal, Robert
Watson, Angie
Watson, Chad
Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Keith
Webster, Andy
Webster, Lori
Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
Wilson, Amanda
Wilson, Bob
Wilson, Heather
Wilson, Jessica
Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Wooten, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Wyne, Tracey